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WCMC among 17 to earn Governor's Quality awards

WCMC among 17 to earn Governor's Quality awards

Seventeen organizations from throughout the state were presented Arkansas Governor’s Quality Awards by Governor Mike Beebe during the 18th Annual Awards Celebration for the Governor’s Quality Award Program on Monday, September 24 at the Peabody Hotel Little Rock. Approximately 300 business and civic leaders from throughout Arkansas attended the celebration. AEDC Executive Director Grant Tennille was the guest speaker.

White County Medical Center of Searcy took top honors in receiving the Governor’s Award for Performance Excellence.

The Achievement Level Award was presented to: Drew Memorial Hospital, Monticello; Freight Systems, Inc., North Little Rock; Professional Education Center, North Little Rock, and Veterans Health Care System of the Ozarks, Fayetteville.

WCMC Welcomes Orthopedic Surgeon to Medical Community

WCMC Welcomes Orthopedic Surgeon to Medical Community

White County Medical Center is pleased to welcome Orthopedic Surgeon Justin Franz, M.D., to the medical community. Dr. Franz has joined the Searcy Medical Center Orthopedics Department at the White County Surgery Center, a department of WCMC located at 710 Marion Drive. The group also includes Orthopedic Surgeons Kyle Blickenstaff, MD, and Thomas Day, M.D., along with Physician Assistant-Certified Lance Kemper.

Prior to joining the SMC Orthopedics Department, Dr. Franz completed a one-year Sports Medicine Fellowship at the Methodist Hospital System and Memorial Hermann Healthcare System in Houston, Texas. During his fellowship, he had the opportunity to work with high school, local Division I college athletes and professional athletes from teams including the Houston Texans (NFL), Houston Rockets (NBA), Houston Astros (MLB) and the Houston Dynamo (MLS).

UAMS report: Blacks at 'significantly higher' risk of death from cancer, HIV

UAMS report: Blacks at 'significantly higher' risk of death from cancer, HIV

Health Status of African-Americans Detailed in  UAMS College of Public Health Report

LITTLE ROCK – Mortality rates of African-Americans were significantly higher than those of Caucasians for most cancers, HIV and homicide, but lower for motor vehicle crashes and suicide, according to a recent report compiled by the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Fay W. Boozman College of Public Health.

That’s just one of many findings detailed in a joint study focusing on the health status of African-Americans in Arkansas compiled by UAMS and supported by the Arkansas Minority Health Commission (AMHC), the Arkansas Center for Health Disparities and the Arkansas Prevention Research Center. The full report can be found here: www.uams.edu/coph/reports/ or www.arminorityhealth.com/reports_updates.html.

White ranks 8 in number of healthy Arkansas counties

White ranks 8 in number of healthy Arkansas counties

County-by-county rankings show what influences health, longevity
 
The third annual County Health Rankings were released Tuesday. The Rankings are an annual check-up that measure how healthy people are and how long they live in more than 3,000 counties and the District of Columbia.

These New Ads Might Shock You – They Might Also Save Your Life

These New Ads Might Shock You – They Might Also Save Your Life

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has launched a national education campaign that depicts the harsh reality of illness and damage real people suffer as a result of smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke.  The ads show the toll smoking-related illnesses take on real people and their loved ones.  Viewers in Arkansas will see the ads from March 19 to June 9.
 

Get your plate in shape

Get your plate in shape

Coalition Educates Children, Adults on What, When and How to eat to be Healthy, Combat Obesity

LITTLE ROCK, AR (Feb. 28, 2012) – March is National Nutrition Month® and a good time to “Get Your Plate in Shape.” Arkansas was named the ninth most obese state in the country, according to the eighth annual F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America's Future 2011, a report from the Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). In addition, nearly one-third of our state’s adults – 30.6 percent – are obese.

While these statistics are staggering, they represent only part of the health problem in Arkansas.  Obesity is a primary contributor to serious chronic illnesses like diabetes and heart disease.  According to the Arkansas Department of Health, 53 percent of Arkansas adults are living with at least one chronic disease.  

Girls get ready for 'Camp iRock'

Girls get ready for 'Camp iRock'

The Arkansas Minority Health Commission (AMHC) is now accepting applications for Camp iRock 2012, to be held June 3-9 at Ferncliff Camp and Conference Center seven miles west of Little Rock. Camp iRock is a free, week-long experience that takes advantage of interactive dialogue, workshops, and exercises to promote physical activity, healthy lifestyles and self-confidence in young girls.

The common threads among diseases that disproportionately affect minorities are poor nutrition and obesity. As a result of this epidemic, the AMHC voted to add nutrition and fitness as an overarching focus. Camp iRock was created to curve the impact of poor nutrition and obesity in Arkansas. The 2012 camp will focus on empowering young girls with the tools they need to improve their health and lifestyle choices.